7 Common Elements Caught in the Design for Manufacturing Process

Getting products to market fast and on budget are two critical factors in the manufacturing process. The design for manufacturing process is cited by both product manufacturers and injection molders as the step that can have the greatest impact on production outcomes. When plastic injection molders are involved early in the part design process including prototype development and mold flow analysis, many cost and time efficiencies will be realized.

Designing a plastic part for manufacturability from the outset involves several considerations that can ultimately have a significant impact on key variables. While some manufacturers don’t account for design adjustments in their timelines, early collaboration with your molder may uncover aspects of a design that can be optimized to improve the efficiency of part production and performance. Here are a few of the most common elements caught in the design for manufacturing process:

1. Draft

As an essential requirement in injection molding, draft angles make it easier for a finished, cooled part to be released from a mold. Minimizing friction during the part release process is important to prevent damage to the parts, provide a uniform surface finish and reduce wear and tear on the mold.

Draft angles are calculated as a degree measurement from the direction of pull. Designing a part with sufficient draft is critical, which is why design engineers typically recommend minimum draft angles of 0.5 degrees for core and 1.0 degree for the cavity. More draft is also needed if a textured surface is desired and if there are steel shut off surfaces in the tool design.

2. Wall Thickness


Another important factor in part design is wall thickness. A proper and uniform wall thickness reduces the risk of structural and cosmetic defects in injection molded parts.

While typical wall thickness ranges from .04 – .150 for most resins, it is recommended that you work with a knowledgeable injection molder/design engineer to verify thickness specifications for the material(s) you are considering for your part.

Analyzing wall thickness is an essential step in the design process to avoid producing parts that have sink, warp or are ultimately non-functional.

3. Ribs

Ribs are used to strengthen the walls of your part without increasing wall thickness, making them a valuable element in injection molded parts. Particularly in complex parts, good rib design should shorten the mold flow length while ensuring the proper connection of ribs to enhance the strength of the part.

Since thickness and location are essential in rib design, ribs should be no greater than ⅔ of the wall thickness, depending on the material used. Using wider ribs may create design and sinking issues. To mitigate this, a design engineer will typically core out some of the material to reduce shrinking and maintain strength.

Rib length should not exceed 3 times the length of the wall thickness, as anything over this could lead to part shorting/not being able to fill the part completely. Identifying the proper placement, thickness and length of ribs in the early phases of part design is an important element to the viability of a part.

4. Gate Location


A gate is the location where molten plastic material flows into the mold part cavity. While every injection molded part has at least one gate, many parts are manufactured using several gates. Because gate location affects the orientation of the polymer molecules and how the part will shrink during the cooling process, gate location can either make or break your part design and functionality.

For example, if a part is long and narrow and must be absolutely straight, it is best to place the gate at the end of the part. For parts that need to be perfectly round, a centrally located gate is recommended.

Sharing preliminary part designs with your injection molding engineering team, leveraging their knowledge and expertise in material flow, will result in optimal gate placement and injection points.

5. Ejector Pin Location


After a plastic part is molded, ejector pins (located within the B-side/core of the mold) apply just the right amount of force required to eject the part from a mold. Ejector pin location is typically a relatively minor concern in the early phases of design, but marks and indentations can result from improperly placed ejector pins, which is why design and positioning should be considered as early as possible in the process.

The location of ejector pins depends on a number of factors, including draft and texture of sidewalls, depth of walls and ribs, and the type of material used. Reviewing part designs will either confirm that your initial ejector pin placement is correct or may generate further recommendations to improve production outcomes.

6. Sink Areas

When the material in the area of thicker features, such as ribs or bosses, shrinks more than the material in the adjacent wall, sink marks may result in the injection molded plastic part. This occurs because thicker areas cool at a slower rate than the thinner ones, and the different rates of cooling leave a depression on the adjacent wall that is commonly referred to as a sink mark.

Several factors contribute to sink mark formation, including the processing methods used, part geometry, material selection and tooling design. Depending on the part specifications, it may not be possible to adjust geometry and material selection, but there are many options available to eliminate sink areas.

Depending on the part and its final application, tooling design (e.g., cooling channel design, gate type and gate size) can be leveraged to influence sink. In addition, manipulating process conditions (e.g., packing pressure, packing time, length of packing phase and conditions) offers several options to reduce sink. Finally, minor tooling modifications, such as retrofittable components or process modifications (e.g., gas assist or foaming) are also available to combat sink. As a result, it is best to collaborate with your injection molder to determine which methods will work best to mitigate sink in your specific injection molded parts.

7. Parting Lines


Parting line location is worth noting and planning for when producing more complex parts and/or when complicated shapes are required.

Since part designers and molders tend to evaluate parts differently, sharing your design with your injection molder can dramatically affect the production and function of your finished product. If parting line challenges are found, there are several ways to address them.

Being aware of the significance of the parting line in your initial design is a good first step, but that may not be your only option. By leveraging CAD software and mold flow analysis, you may be able to determine other possible locations. Working with a knowledgeable injection molder will keep your part end use top of mind and will guide you to the best possible location for parting lines.

There is no question, engaging your plastic injection molder early in the design for manufacturability process and working closely with a design engineer to identify efficiencies will help get your product to market quicker and on budget. What challenges are you currently facing with the plastic part design process?

Learn how Nicolet Plastics can help you reduce lead times and identify turn-key solutions for every product.

5 Questions to Consider Before the Injection Molding Quote Process

If you’re a manufacturer of products that use plastic parts (or metal parts that can be converted to plastic), it’s likely you’ve considered the injection molding quote process.  Injection molders are known for their ability to help product engineers create efficiencies with getting products to market faster and under budget. They also vary in their ability to produce low to high volume parts in a variety of sizes.

Obtaining an injection molding quote is the first step in determining which injection molder is the best fit for your part and unique specifications. In order to streamline your process, consider these questions before requesting an accurate quote for your part design, development and production.

1. Do you have access to CAD drawings or samples of the part to be quoted?

Injection molders can form the most accurate quotes when they have a clear picture of the part they are being asked to make. Ideally, detailed dimensional drawings (CAD drawings), provide very clear information on the size and complexity of a part. Additionally, a sample or prototype can help an injection molder make discoveries early in the process that will maximize design tweaks and the overall manufacturability.

A sketch or concept is very different from a finished part. There are factors leading from design to manufacturing that are important to consider when moving your idea to reality. In fact, many manufacturers cite the design process as the most prevalent area to create cost and time efficiencies in the injection molding process. If you do not have access to CAD drawings or part samples that have been proven in the production process, it is important to choose an injection molder with significant design engineering experience and / or prototyping capabilities. Let them be a resource to make recommendations that will improve the performance of your part.

2. What does the end use of your part look like? Are there any chemical or environmental factors to consider?

Do you have a clear description of the intended use for your plastic part? Having a clear explanation of the intended use will help your injection molder determine the appropriate design tweaks, material and recommendations for part improvements. The information you provide also offers a picture of the wear and tear a part will be exposed to over time and any environmental factors that may contribute to a part breaking down.

3. What quantity is needed?

Quantity projection is an important factor for many injection molders because it may determine if they can, or are willing to run your part. Most injection molders categorize their business as low volume or high volume. Low volume typically constitutes production runs under 10,000 parts, where high volume may include runs over 750,000 parts.

For shorter production runs, aluminum molds might be recommended. However, if your project will require large quantities over time or multiple runs over time, a hardened steel mold would be the best choice. While the upfront cost of hardened steel is greater, it will produce more consistent, higher quality parts – as well as pay for itself over the life of the tool.

4. What is the size and complexity of the part?

Simply put, more intricate part designs require elaborate mold designs, which generally increase the tool cost. Simple part designs require less complexity in the mold design, lowering the cost of the tool. Working with a knowledgeable injection molder with design engineer capabilities and resources early in your production process will help you find efficiencies across every stage of your project.

Also, understanding the size of your part will help your injection molder determine material quantity estimations.

5. What type of material or resin is required for your part?

There are many part design factors that help determine the best material that will drive the cost, function, versatility and production of your parts. Having a basic understanding of materials available and how they react to the environment your part will be exposed can help give you a starting reference point. Your injection molder should offer a detailed explanation of the materials or resins that best suit the unique needs and cost requirements for your production part.

While you don’t need to know all the ins and outs regarding the design, development, tool transfer and production process prior to obtaining a quote for an injection molded part – it’s always good to be prepared with the details related to your specific part’s needs. There’s no doubt that supplying this information to your injection molder will be valuable in every step of the process. Preparing your answers to these five questions will help you be prepared to establish a beneficial relationship with your injection molder.

 

3 Ways To Avoid Injection Molded Plastic Part Defects

  1. Involve Injection Molder Early & Design Part for Manufacturability

Design is one of the most important factors in avoiding part defects. It’s your earliest opportunity to avoid mistakes that can be costly both in regard to time and budget later on. Good design takes into account objectives including part function, aesthetic, manufacturability and assembly. Working with a knowledgeable design engineer and involving your injection molder early will help you find solutions to meet the needs of your specific part.

There are a number of important design elements to consider to ensure costly part mistakes are avoided:

Wall thickness:

Wall thickness is one of the most important factors with part design. The first rule of thumb is to determine the minimum wall thickness that will meet your design requirements. It is always good practice to work with your injection molder / design engineer to check thickness specifications for the material(s) you are considering for your part. Typical wall thickness ranges from .04 – .150 for most resins.

Important wall-thickness facts:

  • Thinner walls require easier flowing plastics
  • Longer flow lengths (distance from nozzle to the furthest corner of the part) may require thicker walls

Radius:

Sharp corners or angles can impede the flow of material. These abrupt transitions can cause the cavity to not fill or pack properly, creating a part with defects. Material flowing across a sharp corner creates stress in the plastic which can contribute to warp and dimensional instability.

Smooth corners that have a curve versus an angle are important in the injection molding process. The radius should be consistent on the inside and outside of the wall creating a uniform thickness. By incorporating this design element, the material will be able to flow through the cavity evenly.

Gate location:

The location where the molten plastic material flows into the mold part cavity called a gate. Every injection-molded part has at least one gate, and some have several gates. The placement of the gate can help ensure the cavity fills properly; however, it is best to have a uniform wall. Uniform wall thickness helps the mold fill and cool properly. In unavoidable situations, having a proper gate location can be a deciding factor in the success of a part. It is recommended that parts be designed with the gate in a location at which the melt enters the thickest section of the cavity to then flows out of a narrower region.

Draft:

Draft is an angle incorporated into the wall of a mold and the shape of the plastic part so the opening of the cavity is wider than its base. A plastic drinking cup is a good example of draft – it is smaller at the base than at the mouth so that the cup will come out of the mold. Draft is essential for injection molding.

Plastic heavily relies on mold draft in the removal of the part from the mold. When a part is designed without appropriate draft, removal of plastic parts is essentially impossible.

A design with sufficient draft is always considered to be a good practice. 1.5 degrees for a depth of 0.25mm is usually recommended by design engineers. General guidelines suggest that a draft angle of 0.5 degrees is recommended for core and 1.0 degree for cavity.

Surface textures also influence draft requirements. The more depth in a texture the more draft it requires. It is a good practice to determine the surface finish / texture requirements prior to starting you part design.

Ribs:

Ribs are used to help reinforce the overall part strength and support dimensional components of the design. Depending on the material used, ribs should be no greater than 2/3 of the wall thickness. Greater width could cause issues with the design and sinking may occur. To avoid this problem, a designer can often core out some material to reduce the shrinking. In addition, ribs cannot be too tall or too thin.

The height recommendations are generally no more than 3x the wall thickness. The corners should include radii and the height should include a draft (.5 to 1.5 degrees). The draft angle allows the part to be ejected from the mold.

Mold Flow Analysis:

When working with an experienced part designer and injection molder, mold flow analysis should be conducted before tooling production begins. Mold flow software can be used to evaluate the design to make sure it will produce the most consistent and highest quality parts from each cavity of the tool.

A virtual model of the mold is created and, using the known data and characteristics of the chosen material, the software is able to predict how the material will flow into the mold and its cavities. Different data points can be assessed, including pressure, fill time and melt temperature. Doing so allows for optimization of the process before tool production ever begins. 

  1. Don’t Skimp On Tool Design & Build

A perfect, defect-free part begins with the mold. Building the tool likely represents the largest investment in the manufacturing process; therefore, getting it right is critical to the success of a project. All of the design factors listed above are important considerations that can help you avoid costly mistakes. Additionally, the volume of parts required, as well as the material they will be made of will help drive how and with what materials to create the mold.

It’s important to keep in mind that more complex molds create a lot of intricate cavities that the plastic must flow through. Turns throughout the path in which the mold is filled can result in structural stresses and part cooling challenges. Designing a mold to have smooth turns can help with these stresses causing an issue for the part. Draft, as mentioned above, is not always compatible with a part’s design – both aesthetically and functionally. However, even a small amount of draft is preferred to no draft at all. Draft may vary with the surface finish or texture requirement of the part. For example, smoother tooling may require less draft.

Other part defects caused by mold design or maintenance issues include flash and short shots.

Flash:

Flash occurs when melted plastic escapes the mold cavity and appears as a wafer-like extension on a finished part. This defect occurs most often along the ejector pin parting line and is caused by excessive injection speed or pressure, too high of mold temperature and excessive barrel heat. Flash can occur due to poor mold design or neglected maintenance.

Short Shot:

A short shot occurs when resin falls short of filling the mold. It is often caused by gate blockages or too small of gate diameter. Short shot can also occur when the wrong resin type is used or improper process settings. Sometimes, the runner system needs to be redesigned to optimize flow.

  1. Avoid Resin-Related Issues 

Material Selection:

Choosing the best material can drive cost, functionality and versatility of your part. It is essential to work with a knowledgeable design engineer and injection molder to learn how different materials and their characteristics can optimize the production and life of your plastic part. Material selection is often based on the application of the part. Plastic requirements for a medical part may be significantly different than that of an aerospace application. Considerations like temperature, biological and chemical interaction, food or animal contact and more are all critical factors in material selection to avoid part defects.

Discoloration:

Discoloration is a defect that shows streaking or coloring in an injection-molded part. It usually occurs in one of two cases:

  • Improper mixing of the masterbatch, the additive used for coloring material
  • Impurities introduced to the material during the molding process

When a resin batch is not evenly mixed, you might see a streak of coloring in the end product. Additionally, you can have impurities introduced to a mold if the hopper, material feed area or mold plates of a machine are not cleaned properly prior to production. It is imperative that an injection molder clean the injection molding machine prior to producing parts.

Burn Marks:

Burn marks may appear as black or dark red discoloration when a material burns during the injection molding process and can be caused by one or more of the following:

  • Overheating due to trapped air
  • Excessive injection speed
  • Excessive melt temperature

If burn marks occur, there are a few corrective actions a molder can take to avoid further defects.

Burn marks can be avoided by:

  • Shortening the cycle time
  • Lowering the temperature and/or slowing down the injection speed
  • Trapped air can be avoided by ensuring adequate gas vents and gate sizes

Flow Lines:

Flow lines are streaks, patterns, or lines that are visible on a part. This defect is caused by the varying speed at which the molten plastic flows inside the mold tool. Flow lines may also occur as plastic flows through sections with varying wall thickness, or when the injection speed is too low causing the plastic to solidify at different speeds.

Flow lines can be avoided by:

  • Increasing injection speeds and pressure to the optimal level
  • Rounding corners and locations where the wall thickness changes to avoid sudden changes in direction and flow rate

Weld Lines:

Weld lines appear in a part where molten plastics meet each other as they flow from two different sections of the mold. This defect is caused by the inadequate bonding of two or more flow fronts when there is partial solidification of the molten plastic.

Weld lines can be avoided by:

  • Raising the temperature of the mold or molten plastic
  • Increasing the injection speed
  • Adjusting the design for the flow pattern
  • Switching to a plastic with a lower melting temperature

The majority of plastic part defects can be prevented by incorporating proper part and tooling design as well as material selection. The best way to avoid defects is to work with an experienced injection molder that understands the characteristics of various resins and their applications. Learn how Nicolet Plastics can help reduce part manufacturing lead times to get your product to market faster.

Benefits of Metal to Plastic Conversion for Agricultural Parts

metaltoplasticMetal to plastic conversion processes have been used for decades; however, many manufacturers have not considered all the benefits that can be applied to improve products. Guided by the ability to reduce weight and improve fuel efficiency, automotive and aerospace companies have been among the most active in converting metal to plastic. Another industry highly impacted by metal to plastic part conversion is agriculture. With advancements in design, engineered plastics can be just as strong and chemical and heat resistant which makes plastic a great option for fluid handling systems and other high-temperature applications. Here are a few other benefits that manufacturers of agricultural products will see with a metal to plastic part conversion.

1. Design Flexibility:

One of the greatest aspects of converting metal agricultural parts to plastic is the design freedom that is created in the process. It is recommended to work closely with an experienced injection molder and design engineer to gain an understanding of the features that should be taken into account to maintain a complex structural design for your part. Specifically, it’s more efficient to create complex parts out of plastic than metal because injection molding easily allows for under-cuts, threads, ports and tight tolerances.

The design flexibility also enables greater strength in plastic parts. With the ability to mold in features for structural strength like ribs, bosses and gussets, strength can be increased without adding additional cost.

2. Weight:

Reducing part weight with a metal to plastic conversion is another big advantage of the process. Reducing part weight by using plastic gives you more parts per pound of material, significantly reduces shipping costs, and oftentimes improves the end-user’s ease of use with the product. Additionally, in some applications reducing part weight can improve gas mileage and boost recycling opportunities.

3. Cost:

In general, agricultural product manufacturers will see an overall cost reduction for metal to plastic part conversion. There are several ways that cost reduction comes into play throughout the design and injection molding process:

• Multiple metal parts can be replaced by one injection-molded part made of durable, engineered plastic – eliminating the need for fasteners and assembly
• Colors can be added to the plastic polymer, eliminating secondary operations for painting or laser marking
• The need to weld, grind, and add dent and scratch resistance and noise dampening is eliminated

4. New and Improved Polymers:

The continuing advancements in polymer development have enticed many product engineers and designers to evaluate the use of traditional materials such as metal. New and improved polymers have allowed part manufacturers and injection molders the ability to produce parts that were once thought of as impossible to create with plastic.

Advanced polymers with specific fillers and reinforcements also allow engineers the ability to add a significant amount of structural integrity to molded parts. With the proper selection and design optimization, plastic parts can be as strong as metal.

Before moving forward with a plastic to metal part conversion, it is important to meet with an injection molder to determine if the transition is suitable for your product. This process requires considerable analysis that keeps the end use, cost, environmental conditions and manufacturability in mind. Analyzing the benefits for conversion and the real-world environmental impact will help you make the best material choice for your agricultural part.

Are you considering a metal to plastic part conversion? Let Nicolet Plastics walk you through an efficient evaluation process.

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8 Factors in Plastic Part Design for Manufacturability

Plastic Injection Molding DesignDesigning a plastic part for manufacturability involves many important factors that touch on all areas of part design, tooling, material selection and production. First, it is essential to build parts around functional needs by keeping design intent or the end use in mind. Consider weight reductions, the elimination of fabrication and assembly steps, improving structural components, reducing costs and getting products to market quicker. Here are 8 important factors to consider to meet your plastic part design goals for a successful production process.

  1. Material Considerations

Manufacturers often select a familiar grade of plastic from a similar application or rely on recommendations from suppliers. Resins chosen this way may be adequate, but are rarely optimal. Plastic selection is a complex task that involves many considerations, such as:

  • Temperature: Thermal stress that may occur during normal and extreme use conditions, as well as during assembly, finishing and shipping.
  • Chemical resistance: The effects that occur when any solid, liquid or gas come in contact with the part.
  • Agency approvals: Governmental and private standards for properties such as heat resistance, flammability, and electrical and mechanical capabilities.
  • Assembly: The plastic’s cooperation with all assembly steps like bonding, mechanical fasteners and welding.
  • Finish: The material’s ability to produce the desired finish such as gloss, smoothness and other appearance values as it comes from the mold.
  • Cost: Resin pricing as well as the cost calculations for manufacturing, maintenance, assembly and disassembly to reduce labor, tooling, finishing and other costs.
  • Availability: The resin’s availability in regard to amount needed for production.
  1. Radius

Radius should always be a consideration in regard to the part’s thickness – eliminating the likelihood of areas of high stress and possible breakage of the part. A general rule of thumb is that the thickness at a corner should be in the range of 0.9 times the nominal thickness to 1.2 the nominal thickness of the part.

  1. Wall Thickness

Designing your part so that wall thickness is consistent can help avoid many part defects that can occur during the manufacturing process. When plastic melts, it flows to the areas of leas resistance. If your part has inconsistent thicknesses throughout, the melt may flow into the thick areas first (depending on gate locations). When this occurs, the thin areas may not fill properly. Additionally, thicker areas tend to cool more slowly and are at risk for voids or sinking defects. Designing your part with rounded corners will also aid in the proper filling of the part during the molding process.

  1. Gate Location

Gates are critical to ensuring the resin flows properly into the mold. These small components of your design are what directs the flow of resin from the runners to then be distributed through the part. Type of gate and placement has an important impact on the part’s overall quality and viability.

  1. Draft

Draft is the amount of taper on the vertical walls of the plastic part. Without draft, a part may not eject from the mold, or may sustain damage during ejection. Typically, draft angles between 1° and 2° are required, but can vary depending on part restrictions and specifications. 

  1. Inclusion of Ribs

A plastic part that has been designed with a minimal wall thickness will not be as strong as a thicker part – which is why the inclusion of ribs may be needed to help reinforce the part’s strength. Depending on the material used, rib thickness should be between 50 – 70 percent of the relative part thickness to avoid sink marks. To avoid sinking, designers may core out material to reduce defect risk.

  1. Mold Shrinkage

The shrinkage that occurs during the plastic part molding process can be as much as 20 percent by volume. Crystalline and semi-crystalline materials are most prone to thermal shrinkage. Amorphous materials are known to shrink less. Here are a few easy ways to avoid molding shrinkage issues:

  • Adjust the formulation
  • Adjust the mold design to get the dimension you want based on the expected shrinkage that will occur
  • Optimize the processing parameter such as molding temperature, melt temperature, and injection speed/pressure/time, cooling time.
  1. Special Features

Plastic parts should be designed so that mold tools open and eject the part easily. When a part is released, the two sides of an injection mold separate in the opposite direction. When special features like holes, undercuts or shoulders prevent the release from happening, it may be required that side actions be incorporated into the design.

Side actions pull coring in a direction other than the direction of the mold separation. This adds flexibility to the part design and at times, may increase the cost of the mold.

Working with an experienced plastic injection molder and engineering team is a critical component to avoiding many issues that can occur during the design and development process. If you keep these factors in mind during the design process, and align with a knowledgeable plastics engineer, you will be on track to get your product to market quicker and within your budget.

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3 Reasons to Get Your Molder Involved in the Plastic Part Design Process

factory molding machine workshop. close up

When plastic part designers take a collaborative approach to involve mold makers early in the design process, many cost and time to market benefits are realized. Working with an injection molder who can provide expertise and recommendations throughout the design project to ensure your part is developed with the intended use, quality, budget and timeframe in mind will greatly increase the likelihood of a positive outcome.

The most successful parts are created when there is constant communication between a part designer, tool designer and manufacturer. With open consultation and communication, the team can avoid project delays and create efficiencies.

Designing a production-ready part goes beyond aesthetic and function. Here are three important considerations when optimizing a part for manufacturability:

  1. Smart Design & Material Selection

The most important first step in part design and material selection is to consider the environment in which the part will be used. This is called design intent – or the intended use of the completed part. What will the wear and tear be for the part? What temperatures will it be exposed to? Consulting with an experienced molder will help you make informed decisions about the most innovative and widely used materials to ensure your part performs at the highest level. Additionally, specialized tool designers can help you take the following design elements (among many others) into consideration:

  • Part Shape
  • Mold Design
  • Draft
  • Uniform Wall Thickness
  • Radii 
  1. Efficient Mold Design & Fabrication

A part designer and mold maker should work hand in hand to create a mold that will produce a successful part. Molding experts provide invaluable insight not only on how to produce the best part, but also how to get the mold made quickly and cost efficiently. Using design software, designers and engineers can create a mold blueprint and as part design and material selection are tested, can help with making critical adjustments.

A mold needs to be designed around a part and specific factors taken into consideration such as: Where is the gate(s) located and what is the optimal size? How will the part be ejected? Most often, computer simulation techniques such as Mold Flow Analysis are used to provide a predictive analysis and measurement to determine the success or failure of a part. Additionally, the analysis shows how the material will orient with the mold as well as expose potential warp and stress points.

  1. Benefit of Working with a Trusted Partner

Relying on an experienced molder to provide guidance and recommendations during the design and development process can save you significant time and cost for a project. Many service providers do not factor in the costs associated with material testing, radius adjustments, diameters and more. A lack of flexibility or inability to provide what is needed to produce a successful part is another roadblock that manufacturers run in to when trying to take a quick and lowest cost route.

Do your research and have a good understanding of your molder’s expertise and services provided. Working with a partner that will listen to your needs and has the expertise to make cost-saving recommendations throughout the project process, will not only save you money, but time as well.

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